Go jump in a lake

(a personal blog)

Tue-Sep-2014
660 notes
wordsthatfit:

Jeet Heer. [x]

wordsthatfit:

Jeet Heer. [x]

(via sadnessfactory)

Tue-Sep-2014
2,097 notes
liberalsarecool:

ppaction:

NOPE. 

Republicans talking shit AGAIN. This @GOP tweet is the literal opposite of what they believe, campaign, and how they vote.

liberalsarecool:

ppaction:

NOPE. 

Republicans talking shit AGAIN. This @GOP tweet is the literal opposite of what they believe, campaign, and how they vote.

(via thebicker)

Tue-Sep-2014
873 notes

lordbape:

no one’s saying it’s bad that jon stewart is telling people about racism, it’s not bad that white people are hearing jon stewart say it as a white person, but it is worth criticizing and thinking critically about the implications of it. and it is important to be bringing up the pattern of white people only ever trusting the supposedly “unbiased” white man talk about / validate the notion that poc are experiencing racism. just like we should be critical of how some people exclusively trust (especially white) men taking feminist perspectives because they assume it’s objective and factual from a man and irrational and unreasonable from women..

I see a whole lot of truth here

(via seriouslyamerica)

Tue-Sep-2014
144,860 notes

cyb3ranthy:

dark-radiant-mind:

pregnantzombie:

note-a-bear:

chauvinistsushi:

sourcedumal:

boosabe:

spiritgun:

liftedandgiftedd:

3 people stealing the same bike [video]

smh…

entirely fed up with this world 

Damn….

Racism right here.

White people steal, and it’s BRUSHED OFF AND OTHER PEOPLE HELP

Black person? MOB of people come to attack him.

*lies down*

but it’s all in our heads though

This shit is infuriating

They helped the white girl steal it. Not just let her steal it, but HELPED her steal it.

Systemic racism, and anti-black attitudes in the white community don’t exist though.

So many people outing themselves as racists in the YT comments, unsurprisingly

(Source: unvitation, via cognitivedissonance)

Tue-Sep-2014
49 notes
I think, I mean, that we have very gravely underestimated the damage that apartheid inflicted on all of us. You know, the damage to our psyches, the damage that has made — I mean, it shocked me. I went to Nigeria when I was working for the World Council of Churches, and I was due to fly to Jos. And so I go to Lagos airport and I get onto the plane and the two pilots in the cockpit are both black. And whee! I just grew inches. You know, it was fantastic because we had been told that blacks can’t do this.

And we had a smooth takeoff and then we hit the mother and father of turbulence. I mean, it was quite awful, scary. Do you know, I can’t believe it but the first thought that came to my mind was, “Hey, there’s no white men in that cockpit. Are those blacks going to be able to make it?” And of course, they obviously made it — here I am. But the thing is, I had not known that I was damaged to the extent of thinking that somehow actually what those white people who had kept drumming into us in South Africa about our being inferior, about our being incapable, it had lodged somewhere in me.
— 

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, commenting on the oft overlooked mental damage caused by Apartheid (excerpted from this interview)

Now consider that if such White supremacist thoughts can seep so deeply into the psyche of even some Black people, imagine how deeply similar thoughts of White superiority must have penetrated into the subconsciousness of White America over the last 400 years. White people, who just like the rest of us, have been spoon-fed and immersed from birth in White (is always better) Supremacy thinking —all the way from stereotypically racist tropes in » Hollywood movies, to the fashion industry, to our very language, to any number of “simple” implicit racial biases 

I’m Black and consider myself to be fairly “aware” but every now and then even I have to remind myself how pervasive, invasive and ingrained anti-Blackness is in American culture, starting from a very early age. It’s inured in so many aspects of daily life…and I almost want to laugh (or cry) when I think about how many White people literally believe that almost nothing’s ever about race, not to mention the #newBlack people who don’t seem to understand that we’re ALL unwittingly exposed to various degrees of invisible, embedded anti-Blackness each day, from the moment we wake up until we go to sleep

Please don’t give up though. There’s so much left to dismantle and undo

(via odinsblog)
Tue-Sep-2014
27 notes
Mon-Sep-2014
8,721 notes

socialjusticekoolaid:

Protest, BBQ, Voter Reg, Music— community is alive and well in Ferguson. #staywoke #insolidarity #farfromover

(via thefcukingfcukisthisfcukery)

Mon-Sep-2014
165 notes
darokin:

If Plato were alive in the 80’s, using DOS on his IBM PC…

darokin:

If Plato were alive in the 80’s, using DOS on his IBM PC…

(via sadnessfactory)

Mon-Sep-2014
0 notes
Hark, a vagrant: 356

Ida! If she’s not your hero, she should be. She’s mine. 
I gave an interview for the Appendix Journal, and cited her as a figure I’d like to make a comic about, but found it a hard thing, so that it never happened. The reason is easy - if you read about the things Ida Wells fought against, you won’t laugh. You’ll cry, I guarantee. And I thought, well I can’t touch that woman with my dumb internet jokes, she’s serious business. And she is.
But then, people use my comics as a launching device to learn history, and I would hope that part of what I do is to celebrate history, not just poke fun at the easy targets. 
Anyway, I first saw a picture of Ida B. Wells at the Chicago History Museum. She was protesting the lack of African American representation at the Chicago World’s Fair. And I am not sure what it was, but the image stuck with me. You could feel a power in the presence of the lady with the pamphlets. I found out later that she was also handing out information on the terrible truths of lynching in America, a crusade that she is best known for, and rightly so. Her writing on the topic is readily available on the internet, and if you read it, well you’ll spend a good deal of time wondering at the terribleness of humanity, but you’ll also note that she knew how to handle a volatile topic like that with an audience who didn’t want to hear it. But, Ida fought against injustice wherever she saw it. You’ll be happy to know, that at the 1913 Suffragist Parade in Washington, she was told to go to the back, but joined in the middle anyway. 

I’ll leave you with this, a review of Paula J. Giddings’ Ida: A Sword Among Lions, from the Washington Post. Go forth, marvel at this woman, who was the best. Did I mention she was one of the first women in the country to keep her name when she married? A founding member of the NAACP? Ida! Just pioneer everything.

Hark, a vagrant: 356

Ida! If she’s not your hero, she should be. She’s mine. 

I gave an interview for the Appendix Journal, and cited her as a figure I’d like to make a comic about, but found it a hard thing, so that it never happened. The reason is easy - if you read about the things Ida Wells fought against, you won’t laugh. You’ll cry, I guarantee. And I thought, well I can’t touch that woman with my dumb internet jokes, she’s serious business. And she is.

But then, people use my comics as a launching device to learn history, and I would hope that part of what I do is to celebrate history, not just poke fun at the easy targets. 

Anyway, I first saw a picture of Ida B. Wells at the Chicago History Museum. She was protesting the lack of African American representation at the Chicago World’s Fair. And I am not sure what it was, but the image stuck with me. You could feel a power in the presence of the lady with the pamphlets. I found out later that she was also handing out information on the terrible truths of lynching in America, a crusade that she is best known for, and rightly so. Her writing on the topic is readily available on the internet, and if you read it, well you’ll spend a good deal of time wondering at the terribleness of humanity, but you’ll also note that she knew how to handle a volatile topic like that with an audience who didn’t want to hear it. But, Ida fought against injustice wherever she saw it. You’ll be happy to know, that at the 1913 Suffragist Parade in Washington, she was told to go to the back, but joined in the middle anyway

I’ll leave you with this, a review of Paula J. Giddings’ Ida: A Sword Among Lions, from the Washington Post. Go forth, marvel at this woman, who was the best. Did I mention she was one of the first women in the country to keep her name when she married? A founding member of the NAACP? Ida! Just pioneer everything.

Sun-Aug-2014
925 notes
eatsleepdraw:

Chris Hadfield 
by Cindy Bolívar
lntergalactico.tumblr.com

eatsleepdraw:

Chris Hadfield 

by Cindy Bolívar

lntergalactico.tumblr.com

(via sagansense)

Sun-Aug-2014
824 notes
No one is dumb who is curious. The people who don’t ask questions remain clueless throughout their lives.
— Neil DeGrasse Tyson (via rebootsociety)

(via sagansense)

Sun-Aug-2014
122,186 notes
brightchimeradragon:

just-bx:

Just SCience

IT TOOK ME TWO TIMES TO UNDERSTAND WHAT WAS GOING ON, HOLY FUCKING SHIT MY SIDES.

brightchimeradragon:

just-bx:

Just SCience

IT TOOK ME TWO TIMES TO UNDERSTAND WHAT WAS GOING ON, HOLY FUCKING SHIT MY SIDES.

(Source: emedemabri, via iammyfather)

Sat-Aug-2014
22 notes

(Source: cadof, via iammyfather)

Sat-Aug-2014
55,567 notes

ecklecticsoul:

{Strolling Series by Cecile Emeke}

Sexism,Patriarchy,Racism and Colonialsm.Full Discourse

(via palmares-politics)

Sat-Aug-2014
173 notes
canadian-space-agency:

Orbital sunrise, to brighten your weekend. 
Credit: Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev aboard the ISS

canadian-space-agency:

Orbital sunrise, to brighten your weekend. 

Credit: Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev aboard the ISS

(Source: facebook.com, via sagansense)